Press Room

Georgia Museum of Art takes home gold at Southeastern Museums Conference

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

The Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia won two awards in publications design and two for exhibitions at this year’s Southeastern Museums Conference (SEMC) annual meeting, held October 8–10 in Jackson, Mississippi. The museum’s outstanding quarterly newsletter Facet, designed by Athens firm The Adsmith, took home the gold in the Newsletters and Calendar of Events category. “Clinton Hill,” an exhibition catalogue that surveyed the artist’s career as a printmaker, painter and pulp-paper pioneer received gold in the Book and Catalogues category. William U. Eiland, the museum’s director, wrote the book and served as curator for its accompanying installation. Almanac, a firm based in St. Louis, Missouri, was responsible for the book’s design. 

Nathan Sprehe, president and executive director of Almanac, says, “Almanac was thrilled to work with the Georgia Museum of Art on the design of the Clinton Hill catalogue. The final piece’s unexpected size, Smyth-sewn binding, surprising die cuts, varied paper types and printing processes were intended to complement the unconventional characteristics of the show’s installation while at the same time paying homage to what Clinton Hill was best known for.”

The museum also received awards for two exhibitions. “Crafting History: Textiles, Metals and Ceramics at the University of Georgia,” which included works by dozens of UGA faculty members, received a gold award.

Annelies Mondi, deputy director at the museum, said, “My fellow co-curators and I are elated to receive the Gold Award in the Excellence in Exhibitions competition. It is gratifying to be recognized by our professional peers in the Southeast and an honor to receive such a distinction.”

The museum also received a bronze award for “Modern Living: Gio Ponti and the 20th-Century Aesthetics of Design,” an exhibition that presented more than 50 objects, representing some of Ponti’s most outstanding pieces of furniture and decorative objects.

SEMC is a nonprofit organization comprising museums, museum staff, independent professionals and corporate partners who work to provide educational and professional developmental opportunities, improve the exchange of ideas and information and encourage respect and collegiality. SEMC focuses on Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

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Writer: Micah Hicks, micah.hicks25@uga.edu
Contact: Michael Lachowski, 706-542-9078, mlachow@uga.edu

Museum Information
Partial support for the exhibitions and programs at the Georgia Museum of Art is provided by the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art. Individuals, foundations and corporations provide additional museum support through their gifts to the University of Georgia Foundation. The Georgia Museum of Art is located in the Performing and Visual Arts Complex on the East Campus of the University of Georgia. The address is 90 Carlton Street, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. 30602-6719. For more information, including hours, see http://www.georgiamuseum.org or call 706.542.4662.

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Museum celebrates meeting of art and science

Monday, October 15, 2018

Rebecca Rutstein is both an award-winning artist and an ocean explorer. In November of this year she will embark on her fifth deep-sea expedition/artist residency with a team of scientists led by the University of Georgia’s Samantha Joye and the University of North Carolina’s Andreas Teske. While the scientists study hydrothermal vents and the unique carbon-cycling processes occurring in Mexico’s Guaymas Basin in the Sea of Cortez, Rutstein will set up her studio on the ship and create new works inspired by the data they’re collecting in real time.

Rutstein’s work will be on display in the year-long exhibition “Out of the Darkness: Light in the Depths of the Sea of Cortez” at the Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia. Annelies Mondi, the museum’s deputy director, said, “We are fortunate to work with an artist so expertly skilled in the languages of both art and science. Rebecca is gifted in translating the veiled mysteries of the natural world so that through her sculpture and painting, we can all experience the wonder of our surroundings.”

Rustein will also serve as UGA’s Delta Visiting Chair, a position established by the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts through the support of the Delta Air Lines Foundation that hosts outstanding global scholars, leading creative thinkers, artists and intellectuals who teach and perform research at UGA. Its first honoree was Alice Walker in 2015, followed by Colm Tóibín in 2017. Each holder of the Delta Visiting Chair engages the Georgia community through lectures, seminars, discussions and programs; they present global problems in local context by addressing pressing contemporary questions about the economy, society, and the environment – with a focus on how the arts and humanities can intervene in major contemporary issues.

The exhibition opens November 1, during UGA’s annual Spotlight on the Arts festival, and coincides with the Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru) conference, at which Rustein will speak (on November 2 at 9 a.m. at the UGA Hotel and Conference Center, in a plenary session open to the public). The museum’s Patsy Dudley Pate Balcony will house an immersive 64-foot-long steel sculpture installation. This sculpture, on view through the following October, contains hexagonal sculptural forms and reactive LED lights that will create trails mimicking the movements of the viewer. Its forms were inspired by data Joye previously collected on the hydrocarbon structures and bioluminescence present in the Guaymas Basin.

The exhibition will also include “Progenitor Series,” a 22-foot-tall painting installation spanning two stories in the museum’s M. Smith Griffith Grand Hall and on view through March 31. The vertical orientation is inspired by the water column and Joye’s 2,200-meter descent to the ocean floor at Guaymas Basin. In each canvas of the series, Rutstein shifts scale and orientation while utilizing various data collected at sea, including sonar maps of hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor. Through the lens of abstraction and with her continued interest in the fractal geometry of nature, Rutstein sheds light on the little-known processes at Guaymas Basin, connecting us with this hidden realm.

Since earning her master of fine arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1997, the Philadelphia-based artist has extensively exhibited her paintings, installations, public art and sculptures throughout the United States. With works inspired by geology, microbiology and marine science, she has had more than 25 solo exhibitions at venues such as Sherry Leedy Contemporary Art (Kansas City, Missouri), the California Museum of Art Thousand Oaks, the John Hartell Gallery (Ithaca, New York), Zane Bennett Contemporary Art (Santa Fe, New Mexico) and the Bridgette Mayer Gallery (Philadelphia).

Rutstein has been commercially represented by the Bridgette Mayer Gallery in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania since 2001. She has previously collaborated with scientists aboard research vessels sailing from the Galápagos Islands to California, from Vietnam to Guam and in the waters surrounding Tahiti. She will also be making her first descent in the Alvin submersible to the ocean floor off of the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica with a team of scientists from Temple University this month, returning just in time for the a2ru conference. While recently she has been reinterpreting sonar mapping data of the ocean floor within her work, she has also shed light on land-based geological phenomenons. Rutstein’s artistic adventures include residencies in Iceland, Hawaii, the Canadian Rockies, Washington’s San Juan Islands, California’s Santa Cruz Mountains and along the banks of the Gihon River in Vermont.

Rutstein’s additional awards include a Percent for Art Commission with Temple University, a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, an Independence Foundation Fellowship and a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Grant. Her work has been featured on NPR and in the Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, Vice Magazine and New American Paintings. Her work can be found in public collections including those of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Museum and Temple University, as well as in private and corporate collections throughout the United States.

Related events at the museum include:

• a Family Day on December 1 from 10 a.m. to noon
• a Toddler Tuesday on December 4 at 10 a.m. (register via sagekincaid@uga.edu or 706.542.0448)
• 90 Carlton: Winter, the museum’s quarterly reception, on February 8 (free for members, $5 nonmembers)
• a public tour with Annelies Mondi on March 20 at 2 p.m.
• a lecture by Rutstein on March 28 at 5:30 p.m.

All programs are free and open to the public unless otherwise indicated.

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Writer: Micah Hicks, micah.hicks25@uga.edu
Contact: Michael Lachowski, 706-542-9078, mlachow@uga.edu

Museum Information
Partial support for the exhibitions and programs at the Georgia Museum of Art is provided by the Georgia Council for the Arts through the appropriations of the Georgia General Assembly. The Georgia Council for the Arts also receives support from its partner agency, the National Endowment for the Arts. Individuals, foundations and corporations provide additional museum support through their gifts to the University of Georgia Foundation. The Georgia Museum of Art is located in the Performing and Visual Arts Complex on the East Campus of the University of Georgia. The address is 90 Carlton Street, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. 30602-1502. For more information, including hours, see http://www.georgiamuseum.org or call 706-542-4662.

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Autumn 2018

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AC Carter to play Museum Mix

Monday, September 17, 2018

The Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia will host Museum Mix on Thursday, September 27, from 8 to 11 p.m. All of the galleries will be open for the late-night art party. DJ .53 will be blasting your favorites, and free refreshments and snacks will be provided. The event is free and open to the public.

AC Carter, a second-year master of fine arts student in sculpture at the Lamar Dodd School of Art, will be playing the music for the night and has many DJ alter egos. She says, “Lambda Celsius is sort of the main brain, with the other characters associated with them such as: Ana Echo, the conceptual character that formats the new record (currently billed and performing); DJ .53 (who is currently being drafted into existence); and Vixcine Martine, the PhD student accepted into Lamar Dodd who is researching women in music, and how ‘stars’ are born by documenting and analyzing the work of Lambda Celsius.”

DJ .53 will be joining us for Museum Mix. Carter says, “When I DJ as .53, I spin 80s post punk and synth wave, as well as current artists who cross genres, ranging from the experimental to pop, finding the similarities between the 80s and the now. Expect to hear The Associates with Holly Herndon, A.R. Kane with Peaches and Grace Jones with Geneva Jacuzzi.”

Exhibitions on view include: “For Home and Country: World War I Posters from the Blum Collection,” “One Heart, One Way: The Journey of a Princely Art Collection” and “Vernacular Modernism: The Photography of Doris Ulmann.”

Sponsors of the event include: Cinnaholic, Cali-N-Tito’s, Ike & Jane Cafe and Bakery, Taziki’s Mediterranean Cafe, Marti’s at Midday and Big City Bread.

Museum Information

Partial support for the exhibitions and programs at the Georgia Museum of Art is provided by the Georgia Council for the Arts through the appropriations of the Georgia General Assembly. The Georgia Council for the Arts also receives support from its partner agency, the National Endowment for the Arts. Individuals, foundations and corporations provide additional museum support through their gifts to the University of Georgia Foundation. The Georgia Museum of Art is located in the Performing and Visual Arts Complex on the East Campus of the University of Georgia. The address is 90 Carlton Street, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. 30602-1502. For more information, including hours, see georgiamuseum.org or call 706-542-4662.

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Sculptor Richard Hunt fuses diverse influences

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Art and experimental zoology aren’t the most obvious of pairings, but sculptor Richard Hunt worked in an animal lab at the University of Chicago as a teenager, earning money to pay for college. The result was an influence that has spanned his six-decades-long career, which will be on view in “Richard Hunt: Synthesis.” This exhibition organized by the Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia will be on view from October 20 through February 3.

Hunt has created more than 130 large-scale public commissions and helped change the role of public sculpture in the late 20th and early 21st century. He got his start in Chicago, where he was born. His father was a barber from rural Georgia and his mother a librarian, who encouraged his early interest in the arts by taking him to museums. When he was 13, Hunt began attending the Junior School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where his teachers shaped his interest in different working materials. His high school yearbook lists him as a painter and sculptor. Nelli Bar, a German-born sculptor, inspired him to pursue a career as an artist and continued to be a mentor to him for years. He tended animals in the lab from 1951 to 1957 and enrolled in college at the Art Institute in 1953, where he taught himself to weld.

Hunt’s interest in biology (both animal and plant forms) can be seen in his early sculptures, mostly made from found objects. He had early success, with the Museum of Modern Art, in New York, buying one of his sculptures in 1957 and Life magazine naming him one of its “Red Hot Hundred” young leaders in 1962. His career in public sculpture began in in 1967, with “Play,” created for the John J. Madden Mental Health Center. This work marked the beginning of what Hunt called his “second career,” in which he made works that responded both to architectural specifics and the personality of the communities surrounding them.

In 1971, a retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art gave his career even more momentum and recognition. Some works from that exhibition will be in included in “Richard Hunt: Synthesis.” The exhibition traces the phases of Hunt’s career, including through two-dimensional works that show his consistent interest in linear forms.

Of particular interest for Georgians, Hunt created “Wisdom Bridge” for the downtown branch of the Atlanta Public Library and a pair of sculptures (“Tower of Aspirations” and “And They Went Down Both into the Water”) for Augusta’s Springfield Park. In addition to public works, Hunt maintained a studio career, constantly experimenting with a variety of media.

Shawnya Harris, the museum’s Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Curator of African American and African Diasporic Art, has known Hunt since 2003, when she was director of the University
Galleries at North Carolina A&T State University. This is the second exhibition of his work she has organized, and it draws from public and private collections all over the country. In conjunction with the exhibition, the museum will publish a 120-page hardcover book by Harris that includes an analysis of Hunt’s career, including both public commissions and studio sculpture. It will be available for purchase in the Museum Shop, from Avid Bookshop or online from Amazon.com.

The exhibition, publication and related programs are generously sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Irwin and Hannah Harvey Family Fund, the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art.

Related events include:
• a public conversation with Hunt on October 19 at 4:30 p.m. (in the museum’s M. Smith Griffith Auditorium)
• 90 Carlton: Autumn, the museum’s quarterly reception (free for museum members, $5 non-members) on October 19 at 5:30 p.m.
• a public tour with Harris on October 31 at 2 p.m.
• a Family Day as part of UGA’s 2019 Spotlight on the Arts festival on November 3 from 10 a.m. to noon
• a Toddler Tuesday on November 13 at 10 a.m. (register via sagekincaid@uga.edu or 706.542.0448)
• a screening of Charlie Ahearn’s documentary “Richard Hunt: Sculptor” on November 29 at 7 p.m.
• an Artful Conversation on December 5 at 2 p.m.
• and a Teen Studio on January 17 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. (email sagekincaid@uga.edu or call 706.542.8863 to reserve a spot).

All programs are free and open to the public unless otherwise indicated. The exhibition will also serve as the focus of the museum’s 5th-grade tours as part of Experience UGA this year, allowing all 5th-grade students in the Clarke County School District to experience the works of a pioneering African American sculptor.

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Writer: Ashlyn Davis, ashlyn.davis25@uga.edu
Contact: Michael Lachowski, 706-542-9078, mlachow@uga.edu

Museum Information
Partial support for the exhibitions and programs at the Georgia Museum of Art is provided by the Georgia Council for the Arts through the appropriations of the Georgia General Assembly. The Georgia Council for the Arts also receives support from its partner agency, the National Endowment for the Arts. Individuals, foundations and corporations provide additional museum support through their gifts to the University of Georgia Foundation. The Georgia Museum of Art is located in the Performing and Visual Arts Complex on the East Campus of the University of Georgia. The address is 90 Carlton Street, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. 30602-1502. For more information, including hours, see http://www.georgiamuseum.org or call 706-542-4662.

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